Book Review — ‘The Name of the Wind’ by Patrick Rothfuss

Image“It was night again. The Waystone Inn lay in silence, and it was a silence of three parts.”

So it began, and I was hooked.

A page-long prologue begins this story, and you feel a shiver of anticipation, a burning curiosity, a certain knowledge that what follows will be something wonderful.

‘The Name of the Wind’, by Patrick Rothfuss, was recommended to me by a good friend months ago. Our tastes differ on occasion, yet coincide often enough to be interested by his profession that this was his favourite book. He also sent me links to Rothfuss’ blog every time we talked online. Still, I haven’t been reading as much lately through lack of time, lack of concentration and general laziness. I’m working on it. I was wary when I saw how large this book was. I have been a fan of fantasy, but my problem with it is often that it relies a bit too heavily on my curiosity lasting long enough for the story to be begin properly. This large epic fantasy seemed like an investment of my time and energy, as well as the oft-unwilling efforts of my scarce concentration. I was wrong. This was impossible not to read.

I read the prologue a week ago, because I saw it was only a page long. I regretted it. I had to go back to college and do a million essays and read other, far less intriguing stories. I did not have the time, and I know myself well enough to assume that I would not be able to read this book in stops and starts. No, I would need to keep reading, and nothing else would be done. Regretfully, I set it back down.

I came home this weekend, checked my emails, said a perfunctory ‘hello’ to my family, and curled up with this book. I finished it two days later, and was very proud of myself for resisting the temptation to skip meals and sleep.

It is subtitled ‘The Kingkiller Chronicle: Day One’, which causes brief panic that we might have another ‘Ulysses’ on our hands but several times larger. But no, the day passes within the novel, but the story mostly takes place over flashbacks that span several years. I won’t spoil the particulars of the this epic — I wouldn’t know where to begin — but I laughed, cried, felt suspense and fear and rejoiced in the beauty of this book. There is no gratuitous description, but enough to make the story live and breath and positively glitter in your mind’s eye. It is possibly the most beautifully written fantasy epic I have ever read. The characters are full of bravery, cruelty, folly and love in the most delicately demonstrated ways. They feel heart-breakingly possible. Within a page, I wanted to know the story of Kvothe the Kingkiller, the Arcane, the Bloodless. I needed to know.

Fantasy always has magic, and it needs to be carefully handled. If the magic is too carefully applied, the reader is bored. If the magic is too powerful, it feels untrue. The magic within this novel is wonderfully conceived, wonderfully controlled and utterly believable — almost scientific in its intricacy, working along with existing physics. Nothing appears made up for the convenience of the plot — the laws of this world appear rigid and uncontrolled by the author. He never breaks them.

Despite being a fantasy novel, this book’s true magic lies within language, realism, harsh truth, beauty, human cruelty and horror and only occasionally within the extraordinary. I would have kept reading even if Kvothe was just going on a walk. That’s the power that lies in this brand of artful storytelling. I was bewitched.

I shall halt my ramble, and must simply end with an eager recommendation to one and all. This book is worth any time  you have to spare. Read the prologue, and see if you can stop there. I bought the sequel yesterday, and if I didn’t have more work to do, I’d already be reading it. It’s beside me now, tempting me …

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